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giftedness.org
 
Definitions High-Ability

Those school-based definitions are relative; at one school a child can be seen as gifted and at another the child is not considered gifted, it can even differ from year to year. It differs between schools, countries and continents.

The research based definitions of giftedness are the result of research done into the field of giftedness, influenced by the perspectives of the different researchers. Those definitions of giftedness are mostly connected with a theory that can be used to enhance or research the situation of gifted pupils and can be applied in research, testing, the classroom, intellectual peer groups or counselling situations. (Bainbridge)

But in general teachers and parents confirm that behaviour and constitution of the highly gifted differ from their peers. (Lind, 2001)

The schools’ definition of giftedness can differ significantly from the professional definition of giftedness and the parents’ definition of giftedness.

These differences in definition can be a cause for concern and confusion for schools, teachers, professionals, parents and pupils, making communication difficult.

In discussing giftedness it is therefore important to be clear about which giftedness is being talked about, or come to an agreement.


There are more then hundred definitions of giftedness (Hany cited in Persson). No single definition of giftedness is accepted  by everyone or even by a majority of people (Bainbridge).

There are several general ways of defining giftedness. 

The first is based on schools’ definitions of giftedness, mostly based on the policy of the government’s Department of Education in that country.

Make a difference

Eclectic Approach
A solution focused eclectic approach towards giftedness has been, until now, most effective.
All developed definitions and their theories deal with other aspects or sides of giftedness and often contribute positively with practical ideas towards meeting the intellectual, social and emotional needs of the gifted. 
Most helpful in coaching gifted children has been the notion of Silverman (2005) of giftedness as an asynchronous development, which the Columbus Group (1991) has defined as follow:

“The school’s definition of giftedness can differ significantly from the professionals and the parents definition of giftedness. This can cause confusion for schools, teachers and parents.”


“I never teach my pupils. I only attempt to provide the conditions in which they can learn.”


Albert Einstein

  1. Giftedness is 'asynchronous development' in which advanced cognitive abilities and heightened intensity combine to create inner experiences and awareness that are qualitatively different from the norm.

  2. This asynchrony increases with higher intellectual capacity.

  3. The uniqueness of the gifted renders them particularly vulnerable and requires modifications in parenting, teaching and counselling in order for them to develop optimally."

                                            (Columbus Group, 1991)

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Free Introductory Talk
You are welcome to book a Free Introductory Talk with Simone de Hoogh ‘Specialist in Gifted Education’, Qualified Coach and Parenting Consultant by phone/ Skype or in person to explore if she could be of support for you, e-mail or phone/ text 0792 636 6511 for appointment.http://www.simonedehoogh.co.uk/_/Consultancy_1.htmlmailto:simonedehoogh@me.com?subject=free%20introductory%20talkmailto:simonedehoogh@me.com?subject=free%20introductory%20talkshapeimage_5_link_0shapeimage_5_link_1shapeimage_5_link_2
Free Introductory Talk
You are welcome to book a Free Introductory Talk with Simone de Hoogh ‘Specialist in Gifted Education’, Qualified Coach and Parenting Consultant by phone/ Skype or in person to explore if she could be of support for you, e-mail or phone/ text 0792 636 6511 for appointment.http://www.simonedehoogh.co.uk/_/Consultancy_1.htmlmailto:simonedehoogh@me.com?subject=free%20introductory%20talkshapeimage_6_link_0shapeimage_6_link_1

The word gifted 
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Gifted children need support
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Definitions of high-ability
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Characteristics
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High-able children at risk
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Nature / nurture?
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Limitations IQ
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Asynchronous Development
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Overexcitabilities
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Problems encountered
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High-ability and Society
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Home Education
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World Language
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Perspective for the high-able: 
Dabrowski
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